SECURERELIABLE
DATA DESTRUCTION
BUSINESS SERVICES
SHELTERED WORKSHOP
NOTICE:

It's with regret to announce that our customer drop off dock will be closed for a minimum of 4 weeks (from June 12) due to our main fire sprinkler line/pipe leak that caused major flooding in our building. A large portion of the foundation near this fire sprinkler line/pipe was washed away. Major structural repairs are required. We are providing pick up service on a small scale but have a 2 - 3 week turnaround due to our COVID-19 closure. Please stay posted for updated information. Our most sincere apologies to our customers. This is an unprecedented season for us.

The Meadows Blog

Hope

Michael Crawley - Sunday, May 08, 2016

It is a fact that all human beings must have hope. Being hopeful promotes good health. It benefits us physically, psychologically and emotionally. It is intellectually stimulating to have positive expectations for your life. It is important to be able to face the future without fear. Having hope gives us a sense of well-being about ourselves and our families. It is a feeling that life can be more. It’s an expectation that things do not have to remain the same. Hope represents possibility. It is the promise of something better. It is the belief that situations or conditions will improve. 
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Employment Choice

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, April 26, 2016

In recent years there has been a concerted effort, which is long overdue, to ensure that people with developmental disabilities are given every opportunity for full inclusion in all areas of society, including employment. There is now legislation being put in place which stresses that individuals with intellectual challenges must have more choices in their employment options. We certainly agree that is a desirable outcome. 
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Thankful

Michael Crawley - Sunday, March 27, 2016

I have been writing this blog for almost three years now. During that time I have tried, with only a few exceptions, not to focus on myself. We have so many people, particularly our employees and their families, that provide such wonderful ideas and material to work with that there is always an abundance of interesting topics to explore. But just this once I want to explain how thankful I feel to be working at the Meadows. 
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The Teachers

Michael Crawley - Sunday, March 13, 2016

Because the Meadows is a vocational setting, our focus is on training people with developmental disabilities to provide them with the job skills they need to be successful. However, because of the complex needs of the individuals we work with, it is impossible not to connect with them on a much deeper level. And it is that rich interaction that allows us to see life from their perspective and to understand that perhaps the way they see the world is a beautiful lesson in being human.    
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Lights In The Darkness

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 07, 2016

Someone I did not know has died. So why does it matter to me? 
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Our Customers

Michael Crawley - Sunday, January 24, 2016

The Meadows Center for Opportunity is a non-profit foundation that offers employment and vocational training to men and women with developmental disabilities and other intellectual and physical challenges. Our mission is to provide the opportunity for adults to work in a safe and supervised setting where they can maximize their existing strengths and abilities while they learn new skills that can benefit them in the future.  

For more than three decades our organization has been blessed with consistent success, due in large part to the incredible loyalty of our customers. They have been unwavering in their support of our efforts to make a difference through meaningful employment. We could not be a positive force for people with disabilities without their help.  

Some of our customers use us specifically because of the individuals we hire. They want to be part of something that adds value to the community and that plays an important role in the lives of people who are often marginalized. Others use our services because of the exceptionally high quality of our work and our affordable pricing structure, but no matter what their motivation, we are extremely grateful for each of the more than 3,000 customers statewide who choose the Meadows for their secure data destruction.   

Obviously their patronage gives us the ability to ensure that our employees receive a steady paycheck, but it provides so much more than just financial stability. It also gives adults with developmental disabilities the opportunity to be successful which builds their self-esteem and self-confidence. It gives them a sense of acceptance as they work as part of a team for a common goal. It allows them to experience the dignity of work. 

The businesses, government agencies, schools, medical facilities, law firms and other organizations that use us for their shredding needs are truly partners in our mission to change lives. Without their ongoing support we would not be able maintain our commitment to hire people who are frequently ignored in the job market, but who sincerely want to work - and have the right to work.

The individuals we employ have achieved and accomplished far more than many believed was possible, and our customers deserve a great deal of the credit for acting on their conviction that adults with intellectual challenges deserve to work. Their continuing support allows our organization to consistently maintain a standard of excellence that is the direct result of the amazing efforts of our employees.

The jobs that our customers help to provide are an important part of the lives of those who are among the most vulnerable in our society. These men and women take great pride in having the opportunity to reach their maximum potential. Their complete dedication in doing their work correctly and efficiently gives us the flexibility to meet deadlines and to adjust to any other special requirements that might be needed.  

Over the years some of our customers have also made contributions to our annual fundraiser, which typically generates between $50,000 and $60,000 dollars. That money is used to purchase new equipment and to upgrade our facility so that we can continue to provide the most professional service possible. We are grateful for the corporate compassion they show in their ongoing commitment to the individuals we employ.   

Unfortunately it is quite easy for a business to think of their customers as faceless non-human entities and vice versa. But in reality, both sides of the transaction are composed of a diverse collection of people all sharing the same hopes, dreams and aspirations. What is different about those who choose to do business with us is their ability to see the humanity of the individuals we employ. They understand that every person should be accepted for who they are, without judgment, regardless of the particular issues they face. They realize that adults with developmental disabilities deserve to have the opportunity to succeed and should not be denied that chance because of a diagnosis. And they believe they have a responsibility to organizations like ours who are providing the structure necessary to allow people with intellectual challenges to achieve their very best.

Through their willingness to embrace the beauty and power of diversity, and by providing the dignity and respect that people with disabilities deserve, our clientele set a powerful example for others to follow.   

On behalf of our management team, our staff and the incredible men and women we employ, the Meadows would like to express our deepest thanks and sincerest appreciation to our customers for supporting our mission through the years.

We look forward to working together in the future.

 
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Memories

Michael Crawley - Saturday, December 19, 2015

Memories are our most prized possessions. They are an accounting of the milestones that have shaped our lives, allowing us to relive the most important moments. The births, the graduations and the weddings are all stored in our minds to be treasured. Each memory is an important part of the collective evidence of the life we’ve led. They are a mental transcript of all the experiences that make up our past, but most importantly, our memories keep us close to those we’ve lost.  
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A Diagnosis

Michael Crawley - Saturday, December 05, 2015

Every parent can clearly remember the exact moment they received the diagnosis that their child had an intellectual challenge. It is a point that alters your life because nothing will ever be the same. The diagnosis changes everything, for everyone, forever. A person can never go back to the life they had before they were given the news.   
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Kindness

Michael Crawley - Sunday, November 15, 2015

Kindness is one of the most important attributes that humanity possesses. It embodies empathy, concern and most importantly goodness. It is freely given and yet it is invaluable. However, it is something we rarely consider. We each go through our day without recognizing the many opportunities we have to be kind to others. How different our world would be if we would made kindness a priority instead of an afterthought.   
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Traumatic Brain Injury

Michael Crawley - Monday, November 02, 2015

Helen was the mother of two beautiful daughters and grandmother of three. She had just spent a pleasant Saturday morning working in her flowerbeds. Now in her mid-sixties, she and her husband were finalizing plans for their retirement. It was certain to be a topic of discussion over lunch. They would soon be heading out to their favorite Italian restaurant, but first she wanted to take a quick shower. Because she was in a hurry she was not a cautious as usual. As Helen was trying to adjust the sprayer she lost her balance and slipped. As she fell, her head struck the side of the tub with terrific force, fracturing the back of her skull and leaving her unconscious.  
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LATEST NEWS


Dreams Come True

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, March 10, 2020

At 6:00 a.m. the alarm goes off. Hoping to put off the inevitable, you reach over and push the snooze button. However, you realize you’re not going back to sleep because your mind is quickly consumed by all of the reasons you don’t want to go to work.  
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The Business of Trust

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, February 18, 2020

In the business world, long-term success can be elusive, but the Meadows has been able to achieve it because of just one word: TRUST. 
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A Meaningful Job

Michael Crawley - Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Employment is a crucial part of every person’s life. Obviously, the financial reward for working is necessary to sustain ourselves - but, in reality, being employed is much more than that.  
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A New Decade of Service

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, January 07, 2020

Although there is much debate over whether 2020 or 2021 is the start of the next decade, for our purposes, we are going to look out over the next ten years starting January 1, 2020. 
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The Truth

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, December 03, 2019

It is an undeniable fact that human beings have always been willing to pass judgment and jump to conclusions about people who they believe are different from them. Unfortunately, this is particularly true when it comes to individuals with developmental disabilities.

These negative perceptions occur because we allow our emotions to guide our thinking instead of seeking the truth which can require effort and an open mind. Consequently, we are quick to label people with challenges and to categorize them for our own convenience. We fail to understand that no two people are the same and that each individual has their own personality and character. But we are, unfortunately, eager to form an opinion about their life without knowing a thing about them.


Here are five common situations that we are all familiar with. In each case, you encounter a person you think cannot possibly be a productive member of society.

You are shopping at the mall when two individuals walk past you. Suddenly one of them collapses with a seizure. You watch in shock as the convulsions run their course. Certain that the person lives in terror with the knowledge that a seizure could occur at any moment, you feel great sympathy for them. You assume their quality of life is compromised and that because of their epilepsy they cannot accomplish anything of significance.

***

You are eating at a restaurant when a person comes in with another adult. You can’t help but stare as they follow their hostess to their table. The individual has partial paralysis on one side of their body and there is visible scarring that indicates that they have endured multiple surgeries. The person walks with a pronounced limp, and you can see that their arm is immobile. You can’t imagine how they make it through the day living with those kinds of issues.

***

You are waiting to check out at the store. The individual in front of you is trying to communicate with the cashier, but their speech is extremely difficult to understand. The people behind you become impatient as the person struggles to convey their thoughts to the cashier who just wants them to move along and get out of the way. You feel great pity for the individual as you wonder what kind of “affliction” could’ve caused their inability to communicate clearly.

***

You are in line to buy a ticket for a movie when an individual standing with their mother becomes agitated about something. Very quickly the person’s behavior escalates and they begin to yell as they lose control of their emotions. Their mother tries to help them calm down, but she is not successful in getting the person to relax. You and others watch with silent disapproval as you harshly judge her lack of parenting skills for allowing this to happen in public.

***

You are waiting for an elevator. The doors open and a person carefully steps out pushing a walker. Their balance is precarious and their legs seem stiff and rigid. It is obvious that they would not be able to walk without the assistive device. You suspect their life is limited in countless ways because of their lack of mobility, and you can’t help thinking it would be better for them to stop trying to walk altogether and to just use a wheelchair.

What do these five people have in common?...... Yes, they each have a disability. Yes, it affects certain areas of their lives, and yes, their diagnosis is often used to unfairly define them. But what might surprise you is one other thing that they have in common. Something positive. Something meaningful. Something that deserves to be acknowledged.

All of these individuals are successfully employed at the Meadows.

Along with almost forty other men and women with intellectual challenges, these five individuals work each day at a variety of jobs that not only provide them with a hard-earned paycheck but also build self-esteem and self-confidence. They learn vocational skills, but, even more importantly, they are given every opportunity to reach their personal potential.

But when these same individuals go out in public, people rush to judge them based on nothing more than appearances. That kind of narrow-mindedness is unfair and unjust.

Obviously, there is an important lesson that must be learned.

When we encounter a person with an intellectual, physical or emotional challenge, we should treat them just like we would anyone else. They deserve to be understood and accepted for who they are as a person. They deserve to be treated with dignity. They deserve to be respected.

The men and women we proudly employ are perfect examples of what people with developmental disabilities can achieve in a positive work setting that offers support and encouragement.

The truth is simple. Every person, regardless of what their challenges happen to be, has the right to live their best life.

That is what our employees do every day.


 
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Why The Meadows Matters

Michael Crawley - Monday, November 11, 2019
 
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It Is Not Too Late!

Michael Crawley - Thursday, October 24, 2019

The Meadows annual Walk-A-Thon, held on Saturday, October 12th, was a tremendous success, and we want to thank everyone who participated.  
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Why We Are Not Hiring

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 25, 2018

People frequently contact the Meadows to see if we are currently hiring individuals with intellectual challenges. Unfortunately, as much as we wish we could, the answer is NO. 
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The Men and Women of the Meadows

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 18, 2018

The mission of our organization is to provide employment and vocational training for adults with developmental disabilities as well as other intellectual and physical challenges. 
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Physical Challenges

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 11, 2018

For those of you who are familiar with the Meadows, you know that on this blog we focus primarily on intellectual challenges. That is because each of the men and women we employ has an IQ of 70 or less, which is the state’s criteria of determining a developmental disability. 
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The Meadows
Center for Opportunity

1000 South Kelly
Edmond, Oklahoma
73003-6081

phone: 405.348.4470
fax: 405.340.5395