WE CAN ACHIEVE
THE EXTRAORDINARY
BUSINESS SERVICES
SHELTERED WORKSHOP
NOTICE:

We’ll be closing early (11:45am) this Friday, July 1st in celebration of Independence Day. We will open again for business on Tuesday, July 5th. Have a fun and safe holiday!

THE MEADOWS VOCATIONAL TRAINING & EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM

The Meadows Center for Opportunity, Inc., is a non-profit, 501(c)3 organization which has been serving the vocational training needs of adults with developmental disabilities.  Since 1983, the Meadows has provided these individuals with the opportunity to work, socialize, and focus on a positive future.

Our employees are involved in a variety of job tasks and business services, including product assembly, packaging, and data destruction.  Through this vocational training, our workers obtain the job skills necessary for continued employment and learning.  Some of our employees achieve complete independence and self-sufficiency as a result of the skills developed in our sheltered workshop.  All gain increased confidence and self-worth in discovering productive skills and earning an income.

Our mission is to provide each person the training and opportunity necessary to realize his or her maximum employment productivity.

What is a Sheltered Workshop?

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services (OKDHS) Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD) offers a number of services to help those with a diagnosis of an intellectual or developmental disability.  State funded services include sheltered workshops, which provide assessment, training, and transitional services that may lead to community job placement. 

According to the OKDHS, sheltered workshops “allow individuals to work and receive training in a controlled environment with many other people with disabilities.”  Workers not only receive vocational training, but they are paid in accordance with individual production and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Nonprofit agencies, such as The Meadows Center for Opportunity, Inc., operate sheltered workshops and may contract with businesses to provide work for sheltered employees.  Services are funded by the state and the Home and Community-Based Waiver (HCBW).

The Meadows Center for Opportunity, Inc. is different from workshops in many other states, because we depend heavily on contracted work and the revenue from that work to maintain operations. We are actually a small business that hires individuals with disabilities. On the average, our workshop’s contract revenue (document destruction and packaging) accounts for 70-75% of our revenue, government assistance 10-20%, and the balance from grants, interest from our investments and our annual fundraiser. Because of our dependency on contract revenue, The Meadows readily responds to customer needs relating to quality, and turn-around time. Jobs performed include; document/media pick-up, delivery of equipment, sorting documents/media for destruction, shredding/destruction, packaging (bagging, shrink wrapping, blister packaging, boxing), assembly (simple to complex), marketing and public relations services (collating, stuffing, and sorting mailings). 70% of our workforce has a developmental disability and they produce high quality results.

To find out more about sheltered workshops in Oklahoma, please visit the Oklahoma Department of Human Services website.

LATEST NEWS


The Last Day

Michael Crawley - Monday, June 27, 2016

For twenty-four years Sharon’s beautiful daughter had been successfully employed at a sheltered workshop, but now that was coming to a heartbreaking end. Over the decades the two of them had always made time to sit down and have breakfast together, and this morning was no different. Usually they talked about what Patricia’s day would be like, but on this Friday her daughter sat silently picking at her food. They had known for over a month that this moment was coming, but now that it had finally arrived they were both overwhelmed with feelings of sadness, regret and a deep sense of anxiety about the future.  
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Fathers

Michael Crawley - Saturday, June 11, 2016

When it comes to raising children with developmental disabilities, mothers receive well deserved attention for their parenting. They are considered the primary caregivers and nurturers. They interact with teachers, health professionals and case managers. They are always on the front lines advocating for their child’s rights, and they are vigilant concerning their health and safety. But although they may not receive the same amount of attention, fathers of children with intellectual challenges also play a crucial role in the life of their child.  
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Redemption

Michael Crawley - Sunday, May 22, 2016

On a cool overcast Saturday morning in early March of 1983, Russell Lynwood was driving alone on a street he had been down countless times. He was familiar with each house he passed. He recognized certain vehicles in the driveways, and he knew which families kept their yards the neatest. Russell was in no particular hurry. He was just running over to the local hardware store to see about buying some parts to repair a leaky faucet. But what he thought would be a simple errand was going to turn out to be an unthinkable event that would change the rest of his life. 
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Hope

Michael Crawley - Sunday, May 08, 2016

It is a fact that all human beings must have hope. Being hopeful promotes good health. It benefits us physically, psychologically and emotionally. It is intellectually stimulating to have positive expectations for your life. It is important to be able to face the future without fear. Having hope gives us a sense of well-being about ourselves and our families. It is a feeling that life can be more. It’s an expectation that things do not have to remain the same. Hope represents possibility. It is the promise of something better. It is the belief that situations or conditions will improve. 
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Employment Choice

Michael Crawley - Tuesday, April 26, 2016

In recent years there has been a concerted effort, which is long overdue, to ensure that people with developmental disabilities are given every opportunity for full inclusion in all areas of society, including employment. There is now legislation being put in place which stresses that individuals with intellectual challenges must have more choices in their employment options. We certainly agree that is a desirable outcome. 
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A Gift

Michael Crawley - Saturday, April 09, 2016

The frail elderly woman sat in her favorite chair next to the window. Shafts of sunlight streamed in as her eighty-three year old hands lovingly sewed her latest baby quilt. Joan had been making them for almost sixty years now, and as long as she was physically able to keep putting together the beautiful colors and patterns she did not intend to stop.  
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Thankful

Michael Crawley - Sunday, March 27, 2016

I have been writing this blog for almost three years now. During that time I have tried, with only a few exceptions, not to focus on myself. We have so many people, particularly our employees and their families, that provide such wonderful ideas and material to work with that there is always an abundance of interesting topics to explore. But just this once I want to explain how thankful I feel to be working at the Meadows. 
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The Teachers

Michael Crawley - Sunday, March 13, 2016

Because the Meadows is a vocational setting, our focus is on training people with developmental disabilities to provide them with the job skills they need to be successful. However, because of the complex needs of the individuals we work with, it is impossible not to connect with them on a much deeper level. And it is that rich interaction that allows us to see life from their perspective and to understand that perhaps the way they see the world is a beautiful lesson in being human.    
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The Only Life

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 21, 2016

A petite woman named Caroline sat alone against the back wall of the large room. The party was in full swing, but no one came near her. In fact people rarely even glanced in her direction. It was as if she was invisible. Everyone else was talking and laughing, engaged in animated conversations. There was music playing and couples were dancing. On the far side of the room there were several long tables covered with a wide variety of refreshments and people were eagerly filling their plates. But Caroline remained completely alone sitting in the new dress she had bought the week before.   
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Lights In The Darkness

Michael Crawley - Sunday, February 07, 2016

Someone I did not know has died. So why does it matter to me? 
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The Meadows
Center for Opportunity

1000 South Kelly
Edmond, Oklahoma
73003-6081

phone: 405.348.4470
fax: 405.340.5395